JustArt Exhibition Catalogue

CATALOGUE

PROUDLY SUPPORTING

This unique collection unifies us in celebrating the creativity of the legal profession and those in the legal community through our common purpose, defending the rights of all.

EXHIBITION VENUE

ust Art unleashes a spectrum of artistic endeavour never seen before from the legal community in NSW. This unique collection unifies us in celebrating the creativity of the legal profession and those in the legal community through our common purpose, defending the rights of all. All works in this exhibition were created on the theme of "justice". Each artist has approached the theme with their own perspective, creating a unique collection of visions of the human condition. JustArt also aims tohelp address one of themost pressing problems facing our society. We must work together to eradicate the disadvantages faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Discrimination and deprivation continue, including through the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in our prisons. Just Art raises much-needed funds for Bara Barang Corporation Ltd, the 2017 charity of choice for The Law Society of NSW. Bara Barang is an Aboriginal Corporation on the Central Coast that provides programs, events, training and services to engage Aboriginal people and youth. Empowering communities and eradicating disadvantage is key to improving school retention rates, promoting vocational learning and employment opportunities and helping Indigenous people transform prejudice to leadership in justice.

PAULINE WRIGHT P resident , T he L aw S ociety of NSW

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D I G I T A L A R T

ST JAMES PHILLIP STREET ROCCO FAZZARI

C anvas print 600 x 400 mm $200 exhibition ref : 5

LIMITED EDITION, 19 COPIES REMAINING

For the past five years, I have been sketching on my iPad. Since April this year, I have been working out of the city and the contrast of old and new in the cityscape has been inspiring me. Late one afternoon crossing Phillip Street (Sydney’s legal precinct), I noticed the vivid blue around the old spire of St James in deep contrast to the shadows

cast between the two modern buildings on Phillip Street. I captured this striking image on my iPad. It captures the valley created by the row of buildings with the luminous light at the end of it, drawing the eye in.

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D I G I T A L A R T

NUREMBERG ANITA KELLY

P rint 550 x 260 mm ( framed ) $400 exhibition ref : 7

Nuremberg is a digital graphic work comprising photographs that were taken on a recent visit to Nuremberg, Germany. The name Nuremberg is synonymous with one of the most famous trials in history, where individuals were prosecuted for crimes against humanity at the end of World War II.

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D I G I T A L A R T

THE ART OF CROSS EXAMINATION STEPHANIE BRITTEN

SOLD

The piece intends to show the impact of cross-examination and the trial process generally on sexual assault complainants, and its potential to re-victimise. The illustration seeks to draw a comparison between questions aimed to wound and degrade, and the almost physical impact they can have on complainants in the witness box. The piece asks the viewer whether Justice

herself becomes the victim when the trial process allows for this re-victimisation.

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D I G I T A L A R T

GARDEN OF LOST JUSTICE MERELYN AKED

SOLD

Disembodied and disconnected from family, land and the indigenous community, the lost souls of the Stolen Generation spin aimlessly... flowers imprisoned in an Australian suburban garden.

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M I X E D M E D I A

ADDICTED TO LOVE ANTONIA MILLER

A ssemblage 200 x 200 mm $1500 exhibition ref : 20

‘Addicted to Love’ features a chain-mounted crystal heart- shaped stone that captures an extract from the report of a 1950s divorce. The words are seen through the naturally occurring fissures of the stone. Around the chained and flawed heart, swirl hypodermic needles and beads made from pages of other criminal trial reports. The domestic anxiety

and violence plays through outward ripples of chaotic addictions, depression and incarceration. But, it is justice that identifies and contains the chaos. Although battered, broken and imperfect, the gold circle holds. There is hope that the radiating lines that filter under the barbed wire and lead outward, forming the suggestion of an ordered

square can create a path to a better life, one of integrity and stability. I am legally trained and have found a unique way to incorporate my love of medieval icons and the essence of law with various contemporary issues and materials, including the pages of old legal casebooks that have been steadily disappearing from our law libraries.

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D R A W I N G

THE ORIGIN OF ETHICS DANIEL EMMERIG

D rawing on scratchboard 420 x 520 mm $800 exhibition ref : 2

My work compares various historical and mythological ideas of what constitutes justice. The lofty ideals of a god-given law, or an inherent human morality, are compared with the base and very human instincts for punishment and revenge. The ideas of personal responsibility (weighing the heart against the feather) and institutionalised law are

also compared. The work is a meditation on a theme, and the flat, decentralised composition creates the opportunity to detect unintended meaning in the placement and comparison of imagery.

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D R A W I N G

MAN DISCARDING JUSTICE, AFTER VOLCKERTSZ COORNHERT 1550 ISABELLA VINEY

SOLD

Lady Justice is an allegorical figure, derived from the Roman goddess of justice ‘Justitia’. Artists have not always depicted Lady Justice as blind or blindfolded; this representation only became commonplace in the late 1500s. However, she is often shown standing tall or seated proudly, her scales evenly balanced and her sword ready to exercise its authority. A much

more unique representation is that by Volckertsz Coornhert in ‘The World Disposing of Justice’ from his series ‘The Unrestrained World’, which carefully considers the fragility of justice in the face of passion and barbarity. Nonetheless, his destabilising depiction of Lady Justice also regresses to the style of over-sexualising and objectifying the female ‘nude’

that is common in Renaissance art. I aimed to preserve the dynamic conflict in the etching, while retaining the integrity of the female figure. Note: This is an original impression of an etching and engraving by Volckertsz Coornhert from a MET art collection. The work is listed as being in public domain by the MET.

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D R A W I N G

WITH JUSTICE, WE CAN FLY AREZZO LILY VARESS

C harcoal and watercolour 620 x 865 mm ( framed ) $990 exhibition ref : 4

When we are lucky enough to have the privilege of justice, we can fly. My work captures the intuition in the eyes of the Blue Jay moments before she rises to new heights. This artwork is symbolistic of the heights we can reach when we are given just behaviour or treatment, and to bring to life the importance of spreading our wings. In the words of the

great Leonardo Da Vinci “Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward. For there, you have been, and there you will always long to return”.

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D R A W I N G

THE VERDICT IS IN MARTA MADISON

SOLD

This is an observational painting done from memory. As an artist I train my eye to see the everyday vignettes of life. While I was walking near the Downing Centre in early March 2017, I was enchanted by a very stylish lawyer running to her court session on this very windy day. I loved the energy and purpose of her stride...she was wearing very

classy heels. Mostly I was taken with the flapping of the gown and the lovely lines of fabric as the wind whipped up her robe. I thought “what a thoroughly modern woman, going about her morning”.

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I N K

CHINESE CALLIGRAPHY YU LIANG

I nk on paper A4 x 3 $150 exhibition ref : 1

The content of this calligraphy is the first part of Li Shao, a poem written by Qu Yuan (340- 278 BC). The poet describes his family background, birthday, name, and his self-cultivation of morals and abilities in order to assist the Emperor of the Chu state to carry out political reform and make his country rich and strong. The paper is traditionally

hand-made handwriting paper from China. Paper like this was used for letters during this ancient time. To write very fine Chinese characters on such paper using a traditional brush, requires excellent control of the brush and the amount of ink for every motion. The ink stick I used was also handmade in China. I ground it against an inkstone with a small amount

of water for about one hour to get the desired thickness for handwriting work. The brush was a small size bamboo handle brush with goat hair.

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P H O T O G R A P H Y

THE DEFIANT IMAGE BERNADETTE SMITH

SOLD

This is an artist book of photographs documenting millennial public protests in Sydney. It is an eyewitness record of campaigns for social justice including student campaigns against campus closures, clergy abuse survivors outside the Royal Commission and climate and Indigenous rights activism.

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P H O T O G R A P H Y

TIMMY ELLA OF THE YUIN- DHARAWAL NATION CHRISTINE GLEISNER

P rint 600 x 400 mm ( unframed ) $750 ( framed ) $550 ( unframed ) exhibition ref : 8

Tim Ella is a member of the Yuin-Dharawal Nation. He was born in La Perouse in 1969, as one of twelve children in a renowned sporting family. In addition to participating in sport himself, throughout his life he has been actively involved in promoting and supporting Aboriginal culture within his community, learning from his uncles the ways of

his traditional ancestors. His dedication paid off early and when he was 22 years old he was the youngest person to be named Chairman of the Land Council for the South Coast Region. Over the years Ella has served as a community leader and mentor for so many, and has his own small business, ‘Kadoo’, to share his knowledge and culture with

the wider community. One of the ultimate expressions of justice is self-determination; being able to practise your culture, express yourself as an individual and determine your own path in life.

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P H O T O G R A P H Y

ANGELA FIREFLY DAVID BONNELL

P rint 900 x 1150 mm ( framed ) $2500 exhibition ref : 40

The reliability of eyewitness accounts has long troubled me. It is unreliable. As is their recollection of exactly what they saw. A camera objectively records the light passing through its lens and provides an authenticity that is relied on in Court. It doesn’t have an imagination or prejudices that can influence. This fascinating ability provides

both an authentic image and one that is abstract and open to interpretation. I seek to produce this abstraction with the camera. This image was not manipulated by Photoshop. It is a result of stacking images through long exposure. It is an authentic recording of what happened. Yet it is still confusing and enigmatic. I hope the viewer goes through

several stages during viewing, from being struck by the colour and movement, to figuring out what is making the gold colour, or how many feet and faces can be seen. The viewer will be rewarded by discovering truth and beauty.

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P H O T O G R A P H Y

AMERICAN HEALTH JUDGE JOE HARMAN

S emi gloss print 750 x 500 mm ( unframed ) 860 x 620 mm ( framed ) $600 exhibition ref : 9

On a hot summer’s day in Washington D.C. I had been to see the White House and was on my way to that most holy of American institutions, Arlington Cemetery. Heading to nearby Farragut West Metro Station I chanced upon this scene. Beneath a sign pointing to the home of the leader of the wealthiest nation on earth, lay a man with soiled bandages

around the stumps that had been his feet, sleeping beside a hospital wheelchair. Bob, a diabetic, had been discharged from hospital two days earlier after his feet had been amputated following peripheral artery disease. He was uninsured and homeless and the hospital needed his bed so he’d been given a wheelchair and discharged. The

juxtaposition of signage and Bob’s prostate form illustrates and speaks to the inequities, inequalities and injustices that are fundamentally woven into the psyche of American society. It is emblematic of the health of American society and the American health care system. The image is both political and personal.

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P H O T O G R A P H Y

ANYTHING HELPS JUDGE JOE HARMAN

S emi gloss print 750 mm x 500 mm ( unframed ) 860 mm x 620 mm ( framed ) $600 exhibition ref 10

I met Casey in San Francisco. She was sitting in a cable car stop shelter to stay out of the wind. She was from the Mid- West and had come to San Fran recently to meet her boyfriend who had returned from his 2nd tour in Iraq. He had been discharged with PTSD. For some reason he wasn’t entitled to Vet assistance and they were homeless and struggling to

scrape money for the trip home. I gave Casey $5 and asked to take her photo. She instantly agreed with a smile, saying “Sure, it makes me feel famous, like a celebrity”. For me, the picture behind Casey (an ad for a PS4 game), represents America and all that is peculiar to it - the cult of celebrity, the absence of any viable welfare network or universal health care,

everything as user pays and the myth that anyone can make it in a society with the most obscene inequality the world has ever seen. As Casey stands before America she is being run through by its sword. Her cup with its epitaph “Anything Helps” is both a plea and a

statement of her reality. In a society of inaction “anything” is a start.

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P H O T O G R A P H Y

CLEARWAY - NO STOPPING - TOW AWAY ZONE CARMELO RAGUSA

SOLD

This photo draws attention to the plight of homeless people and to the challenge faced by State governments, councils, firefighters and others in ensuring that everyone can safely access and use our public spaces. The central traffic sign reminds us of the homeless people that were removed from Martin Place during a very cold

week in winter this year. It also reminds us that, since their return, these members of our community continue to face the same risk. Our eyes are drawn to the bright colours of the signage, the kitchen and the messages of support in the background, particularly given that almost everything else in the picture is in shades of blue and grey.

Even though the colourful elements mirror each other, the messages they convey do not. As the two blue signs, whose distance and angle from the central sign complement each other, tell us where the scene is, the various traffic signs, street poles and tree trunks frame the picture.

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P H O T O G R A P H Y

HOME JUDGE JOE HARMAN

S emi gloss print 750 x 500 mm ( unframed ) 860 x 620 mm ( framed ) $600 exhibition ref : 12

To understand homelessness requires a conception of ‘home’. Home is a place of belonging and acceptance, where you feel safe, secure, protected and your needs are met. Home evokes memories, permits calm and relaxation and inspires. Home is shared with family. It is about dignity and self-respect. Homelessness is more than rooflessness and

lack of shelter (though those are important). Homelessness is about having nowhere you belong or feel safe or secure. It is impermanence and danger. Homelessness is the world saying “we’re sorry, but you’re nothing, you’ve got nothing for us and we’ve got nothing for you”. This photograph was taken from a bus on the way to the Castro, San Francisco in

2015. The man’s pose suggests weariness and possibly despair. He is alone. He is human and dignified. There is hope and pride in his broom to keep his “space” clean. He is dispossessed but not defeated. He is tangible rather than invisible. Behind him the wall declares “home” and yet the very wall excludes him.

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P H O T O G R A P H Y

COMING OR GOING? SIMON JEANS

SOLD

Is the ship coming or going? Your answer might depend on many factors, perhaps your eye for detail or life experience. Justice can have opposite interpretations. In SZUXN, a Judge of the Federal Circuit Court found that one of my decisions as a member of the Refugee Review Tribunal was “vitiated by legal unreasonableness”.

The Minister appealed and a Justice of the Federal Court found that my decision was not irrational or illogical and there was no error of law. Two Justices of the High Court agreed with the judgment of the Federal Court. All five decision-makers believed they were delivering justice. The ship was leaving Mykonos.

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P H O T O G R A P H Y

LEON APOSTLE, BARRISTER DIANE MACDONALD

P rint 610 x 910 mm ( framed ) $500 exhibition ref : 14

“As a Darug man, feeling spiritually content in my role is critical. When you love what you do, agree with what you do and work with your heart, you find yourself and you find success. Take pride in your craft, do it with love and the universe will reward you”. - Leon Apostle

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P H O T O G R A P H Y

GOLDEN GOOSE MARK TEDESCHI AM QC

SOLD

Chester Porter QC was the pre-eminent criminal law silk in New South Wales for many decades until his retirement about 16 years ago. He has also been a friend and mentor to me throughout my career. For all of his adult life he has had a hobby farm with chickens, ducks, bantams and geese. This has kept him fit in both body and mind. Even today, at 91

years of age, he works for some hours each day on his farm.

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P H O T O G R A P H Y

PLEASE DON’T CLIMB WILL HUTCHINS

SOLD

At the base of the climb there is the following sign from the Anangu traditional owners: “Uluru is sacred in our culture. It is a place of great knowledge. Under our traditional law climbing is not permitted. Please don’t climb”.

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P H O T O G R A P H Y

EMOTIONS - PATHWAY TO JUSTICE - #PLEADING ADRIANA KOE

SOLD

This photo is part of a series where young dancers express the roller coaster of emotions that unfold throughout the course of a trial, with the Supreme Court of New South Wales as their dramatic backdrop.

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P A I N T I N G

GREYSCALE ELENA BIJELIC

O il on mdf 800 x 800 mm $3750 exhibition ref : 22

My artwork employs allegorical imagery to comment on my interest in gender and cultural equality. The work principally speaks to equal inclusion, namely the value of both the feminine and masculine paradigm in addressing societal issues, in what has traditionally been a patriarchal system. Moreover, it acknowledges the need to embrace both the

indigenous and contemporary aspects in social and political structures. The artwork aspires to capture the object of achieving equilibrium in Australia’s post-colonial society. Two contrasting figures hold hands, working in unison to attain balance on what mimics a scale of justice. In parity, they represent dual participation in gender equality, indigenous

policy and law. Notwithstanding the heavier set of the male subject, the scales remain in balance, which is representative of the requisite collaboration to maintain that balance, including positive public policy measures achieved through genuine community consultation designed to exact change in Australia’s diverse communities.

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P A I N T I N G

T’WAS THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS EMILY BECKETT

W atercolour on cotton paper 295 x 419 mm $2200 exhibition ref : 23

This painting intends to capture the moment of

eventually overturned on appeal, the case continues to hold importance personally as it was a focus during my transition from student to solicitor as I embraced the enthusiasm of valued mentors. When interpreting the theme “Justice”, I was immediately drawn to the case where I first felt the elevation of pride and satisfaction that accompanies

victory for a worthy party or cause. It is a feeling that most lawyers know, however, it is difficult to describe.

dignified triumph following a “David and Goliath” victory in the Supreme Court. The painting is based on a photograph quickly snapped by counsel’s wife as my principal and she observed the silent surrealism of deserted Sydney

streets on Christmas Eve. Though the decision was

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P A I N T I N G

LIFTING THE LID TRACEY JONES

O il on canvas 500 x 600 mm $600 exhibition ref : 24

This piece uses the internationally recognised

Domestic Violence Resource Centre Victoria one in four women experience intimate partner violence. Aboriginal women are 35 times more likely to be hospitalised by family violence than other women. One women is killed by a partner almost every week and violence against women costs the Australian economy more than $21 billion in 2015. The

United Nations Sustainable Development Goals have a target to “eliminate all forms of violence against all women and girls in the public and private spheres”. The UN notes that “Violence against women and girls violates their human rights and hinders development”. It is time to lift the lid.

symbol of white ribbon to both suggest that victims of domestic violence are denied access to justice if no one speaks out, and to encourage our communities to become more aware of the issue and the impact it has on individual victims and on society. The statistics are alarming. According to the

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P A I N T I N G

LIBERTY, LAW & JUSTICE REBECCA TRAJKOVSKI

A crylic on canvas 609 x 609 mm $5500 exhibition ref : 25

Inspired by a recent trip to New York in June 2017, the painting personifies the current political environment and my experience in Manhattan. Lady Liberty is powerful, bold and strong, represented by her sharp lines and edges. However there are personal elements shown as she weeps and holds her head. Justice, power and the law all have an effect on

Liberty and she is intentionally painted with areas of grey to symbolise that the application of law is not simply black and white. The use of primary blue, a strong and bold colour is also intentional. Primary blue is symbolic of those in the public service and their effect on justice, liberty, security and the law.

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P A I N T I N G

HOPPER ON CIRCUIT MICHAEL O’BRIEN

A crylic and paper on reno board 760 x 510 mm $1000 exhibition ref : 26

After Edward Hopper’s “Morning Light”.

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P A I N T I N G

COAL V CORAL LYNNE PODGORSKI

A crylic on canvas 1020 x 760 mm $1500 exhibition ref : 27

Push back the darkness. A glimpse of a dark future if coal mining operations expand, threatening the Great Barrier Reef.

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P A I N T I N G

THE BIG ISSUE DR MARY CROCK

SOLD

This picture speaks to a problem that should be keeping our law makers and all of us who enjoy positions of wealth and privilege, awake at night: homelessness. Using my own (re-worked) photo of Queen’s Square and Hyde Park as a backdrop, my painting shows an ageing vagabond on a crate that has been abandoned by a magazine seller. He is huddled

against the cold, playing with his dog. The location was chosen because of its proximity to the Courts, and because of the propensity for homeless people to congregate in this part of Sydney. The canvas is a re-purposed hessian sack, stretched and primed roughly with home-made gesso. The materials reference the dirt, roughness and discomfort of

individuals who are forced to live on the streets. The rather two-dimensional homeless man and his dog, together with the Queen, provide a stylistic nod to great street artist, Banksi. The fact that the man is large relative to what should be the proportional size of the statue of Queen Victoria also references the importance of the problem he represents.

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P A I N T I N G

WHAT?! NEESKA WATERS

A crylic on wood 900 x 1200 mm $1200 exhibition ref : 29

The expression of the figure is deliberately ambiguous. It is meant to denote the disdain, resilience and strength of a woman having long suffered at the hand of a violent relationship. Unfortunately, throughout the legal system, support for victims of domestic violence is limited. Victim shaming is prevalent, ongoing support is minimal and the

court processes is gruelling. Accordingly, the pendulum of justice, fairness and equity swings heavily in favour of the offender time and again. The painting includes a variety of colour and texture ranging from deep charcoal glazes to creamy impastos interrupted by runs of thick paint and coarse finishes.

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P A I N T I N G

SHAPE WITHOUT FORM MATTHIJS DE RUIJTER

SOLD

Portrait’s often take direction in encapsulating a subject in its purest form, communicating to audiences expression or emotion. Within ‘Shape Without Form’, reference to T.S. Eliot’s ‘The Hollow Men’ inspired the creation of a piece that attempted to do the opposite, leaving almost all interpretation to the audience. The subject is without emotion,

expression or even origin, it is “shape without form, shade without colour, paralysed force, gesture without motion”.

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P A I N T I N G

IN THE INTERIM IRENE DE CASTRO-PATTERSON

A crylic and pen on canvas 762 x 1219 mm ( approx .) $1250 exhibition ref : 31

Since time immemorial legal studies and research have been the essential ingredients among the eclectic, challenging tasks in the field of law. A practitioner can say physical and mental preparedness are essential attributes for lawyers. I painted old books for a dramatic perception of the legal profession’s emergence early in history. I depicted partly torn

covers to suggest the continued study, review and effort spent on endless research and careful analysis. The dark background represents the late nights studying and all associated hard work dealing with ambiguities and complexities. In the candlelight, what was once obscured gradually becomes clearer. What was once an ambiguous issue becomes

an unequivocal proof. The painting acknowledges the legal practitioners’ unique, great work bound by the principles of the legal system in striving for fairness, equality and justice.

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P A I N T I N G

WINSTON CATHERINE BUTLER

O il on canvas 400 x 500 mm ( framed ) $795 exhibition ref : 32

Winston is a portrait of a homeless man I met in Hyde Park. He was a lovely, amiable gentleman. My daughter and I shared lunch with him. He was more than happy to oblige when my daughter asked if she could take his photograph for her HSC visual arts project. The photo was never used. However, as there was so much character and humanity in his

face I felt I needed to attempt to capture it one day. The issue of homelessness, particularly in such a large, affluent city as Sydney is highly pertinent to the theme of justice. There are many people who have slipped through the cracks and barely exist living on the streets. Many of whom have mental health and/or alcohol and substance abuse

issues. It strikes me everyday when I walk through the park opposite Central station, the injustice that there is such a large underclass within society who have become invisible and somewhat forgotten.

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P A I N T I N G

MARANGAROO HEATHER MCKINNON

O il on linen 1016 x 1016 mm $2400 exhibition ref : 41

Justice for my clients comes through the work I do to help them gain insight into intergenerational family dysfunction, and how the Family Law Act can help them break that cycle, just as I have in my own family. This is a deeply personal and difficult process, yet it is essential as without recognition of these entrenched dynamics, there

can be no justice or resolution. My grandparents lived on a farm at “Marrangaroo” in central west NSW. My grandfather was a clay miner who provided clay for Fowler Pottery. My grandparents had a very conflicted relationship. At the time of my father’s death, he revealed to me that there had been serious violence in his childhood. The painting

is a representation of how this informs my quest for justice. The bottles represent my collection of Fowler Pottery. The objects are allegories for humans, and the collection itself represents family.

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P A I N T I N G

BALANCING JUSTICE - SELF PORTRAIT SARAH WYATT

A crylic on canvas 610 x 460 mm $450 exhibition ref : 21

As a government lawyer, I am accustomed to balancing public interest and natural justice issues against the government’s right to protect its interests in litigation. My painting captures this legal balancing act.

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P A I N T I N G

CLARITY JULIE JIANG

SOLD

Painted from the perspective of a practising lawyer, this piece aims to explore the transient and blurred boundaries of justice, which are represented by flowing water. The scales which traditionally embody the symbol of justice are abstractly represented by two cupped palms holding water. It is implied that the hands have been searching and wading

through the river. Rather than being a literal interpretation of justice, this piece seeks to encourage viewers to contemplate their own values and insights about justice through self reflection. Each person has their own perception of what constitutes justice.

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T E X T I L E S

JUSTITIA VESTIS RAI MOLKI

C otton satin ribbon and nylon 130 cm x 100 cm ( approx .) $800 exhibition ref : 33

‘Justitia Vestis’ is a Rock-a-Billy inspired swing dress with a matching detachable purse and full multi-layered petticoat. The print on the dress has a School of Law and justice theme, featuring books, scales of justice, gavels and ‘Justitia’.

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T E X T I L E S

PATH TO JUSTICE ATHENA HARRIS INGALL

Q uilting and applique on vintage egyptian cotton sheet 1600 x 2030 mm $2500 exhibition ref : 36

The quilt features a winding path to symbolise the path to justice which for some involves traversing difficult terrain, represented by the circles depicting mountains. The clouds at the top of the quilt signify justice: ethereal but never to be lost sight of.

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S C U L P T U R E

RIOT SHIELD #LETS TALK! LEITH KENNEDY, CHIEF INSPECTOR

SOLD

Beat up, now prettied up, yet still a little gritty. This recently decommissioned/ retired “Intermediate Shield” was another special ‘canvas’ for me as a Police Officer and artist. This clear UV stabilized poly-carbonate shield has been brilliantly animated with acrylics and spray paints.

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S C U L P T U R E

MOTHER AND CHILD, VERSION 2 FELICITY CAVANOUGH

T ie wire and red cedar 250 x 150 x 340 mm $1100 exhibition ref : 37

Inspired by my 3rd and final child, this piece is a celebration of those special moments spent nursing and bonding with my beautiful babies. For so many fellow mothers though, breastfeeding has seen them publicly shamed, and despite the law protecting their baby’s right to be fed, I hear time and time again awful stories of mums being shamed into

denying their babies food. My a sculpture intends to provoke a nurturing response, beautifying the bonding and nourishment that is created when a mother breastfeeds her child. My intention is to take away the disgust of those offended by public breastfeeding and to evoke the awareness of this tender, cherished and nourishing

act. I would like to encourage alternate thinking, in the hope that all mothers breastfeeding their babies will not only be supported by the law but by society.

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S C U L P T U R E

THE CASE OF THE THEFT OF THE GREEN STONE OF LIFE SCULPTURE FROM AN ART GALLERY PHILIPPA HANNAY S terling silver wire and peridot semi - precious gemstone 146 mm cube ( display case ) $500 exhibition ref : 38

Representation of a courtroom populated by sterling silver wire figures (bewigged judge,

two barristers, accused, court warden, 12 jurors). The sculpture is being examined by three of the jurors.

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